February Exhibitions and Events at the UMMA

 

Continuing Exhibitions

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection
Through February 18, 2018

A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection showcases the master draftsmanship of two of the most significant artists of the twentieth century: Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015). Curated by Kelly in 2014, the exhibition speaks to his admiration for Matisse, as well as to the centrality of drawing in both artists’ practices. To accompany the forty-five rarely exhibited works by Matisse made in the first half of the 20th century, which reveal his process and range of creativity as a draftsman, Kelly selected nine of his own lithographic drawings that derive from his time in France during the 1960s, when the American artist studied Matisse’s sketches and studies of nature and human figures. Together, the works by Matisse and Kelly form a thought-provoking, visually striking artistic dialogue, allowing viewers to experience one artist through the eyes of another and to immerse themselves in the pleasures of close looking.

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection is organized by the American Federation of Arts and the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum in collaboration with The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.

This exhibition was made possible by the generous support of the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust and The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation. Additional support provided by the JFM Foundation and Mrs. Donald M. Cox.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and the Department of the History of Art.

New at UMMA: Paul Rand
Through April 15, 2018 

The Connector

Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, pioneering art director and graphic designer Paul Rand (1914–1996) was celebrated for crafting the brand identities of such American corporate icons as ABC, IBM, UPS, and Westinghouse. Rand considered the designer’s task to be the symbolic communication of a company’s character. This recent acquisition presentation features the poster Rand created as part of IBM’s THINK promotional campaign. The design is a rebus, or visual puzzle, wherein Rand cleverly transforms the letters of IBM’s logo into pictures. The whimsical use of symbols encourages viewers to interpret—or think—in order to comprehend the company’s intended message that it values “insight,” “industriousness,” and “motivation.” The poster is part of a larger recent gift of archival Paul Rand objects donated to UMMA by Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo—professor in the U-M Stamps School of Art and Design and published scholar on Paul Rand—and Maria Phillips.

This work was recently gifted to UMMA by Maria Phillips and Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo.

Patricia Piccinini: The Comforter
Through April 15, 2018

Irving Stenn, Jr. Family Gallery

Australian artist Patricia Piccinini’s strange, hyperreal yet sentimental sculptures are often rooted in her speculative visualizations of future species—beings transformed by, or even created by, developments in genetic engineering and technology.  On view at UMMA, The Comforter presents the likeness of a young girl whose appearance suggests a rare genetic condition causing excessive hair across her face and body. In her lap she tenderly cradles an udder-shaped, eyeless creature—a possible reference to current experiments in genetically altered milk-producing animals. The encounter staged by the sculpture, though curious and unexplained, appears to be one of innocence and intimacy, and suggests the potential for emotional connection between a diversity of beings. This theme is a common one for Piccinini, whose work incorporates (often obliquely) ideas and questions about the ethical implications of scientific progress and the conflicts in our culture between the natural and the man-made.

Lead support for Patricia Piccinini: The Comforter is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, and the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender.

Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters
Through May 6, 2018

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

In the 1980s, Japan’s strong trade surplus and currency were causing friction and antagonism overseas. In response, three renowned Japanese artists—Ikko Tanaka, Shigeo Fukuda, and Kazumasa Nagai—took on the challenge of changing Japan’s global image through graphic design. In posters promoting trade fairs, cultural festivals, exhibitions, and sporting events, they used a powerful language of simple forms, vivid color, and a touch of humor to foster—both nationally and internationally—a deeper understanding of the different faces of Japan and its long cultural history. Their eye-catching designs often incorporated familiar traditional symbols and motifs, notably the iconic red circle against a white background of Japan’s national flag. Archetypal animals, human figures, and landscapes borrowed from folklore and visual culture were also distilled into forms of iconographic clarity. These dazzling posters are a fascinating chapter in the history of Japan’s ongoing efforts to shape its identity in the post-World War II era.

Lead support for Red Circle is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: The Masterpiece
Through May 13, 2018
Media Gallery

Since the 1980s, British artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster have been known for their shadow sculptures built from materials as diverse as scrap metal, garbage, taxidermy, and sex toys. When light is directed at these assemblages, they project shadows that are exceptionally accurate and intricate representations of other things entirely.

The Masterpiece (2014) is a shadow self-portrait of the artists created from metal casts of dead vermin they collected and welded together into a ball. From afar the casts appear to be a stunning abstract silver sculpture; on closer inspection the disturbing menagerie of creatures emerges, only to change form again—as a shadow on the wall—into a precise and elegant image that is astonishingly different from the objects that create it.

Lead support for Tim Noble and Sue Webster: The Masterpiece is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, the Susan and Richard Gutow Fund, the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities and School for Environment and Sustainability. Additional generous support is provided by the Richard and Janet Miller Fund.

Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation
Through May 27, 2018
Photography Gallery

Over the last 150 years, the medium of photography has powerfully depicted and shaped representations of past and present scenes of devastation. Aftermath examines landscape photographs made at the sites of natural or human-made disasters, capturing the results of destructive forces wrought on the land and its inhabitants, including volcano eruptions and floods, massacres and uprisings, and even nuclear explosions. The photographs portray both well-known and untold stories of violence, tragedy, and loss. Each scene is visually striking, yet viewers may be surprised at the elements of beauty and tranquility present in these tragic landscapes. The exhibition includes images of the aftermath of events spanning over 2,000 years of human history—from ancient Pompeii to September 11, 2001. These photographs remind us that disaster is often a collective experience that can tear apart the seams of a culture’s social fabric and impact societies well after an event.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

Cosmogonic Tattoos
Through June 3, 2018
UMMA Commons and Exterior

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished U­–M art professor Jim Cogswell was invited to create a series of public window installations in response to the holdings of the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist adheres a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative, based on reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. The juxtaposed images address our shared histories and experiences while connecting the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community.

Cosmogonic Tattoos is on view at UMMA through June 3, 2018, and at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology through May 2, 2018.

Lead support for Cosmogonic Tattoos is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

 

 

Exhibition and Gallery Tours

All of UMMA’s tours and events are free and open to the public. No reservations or pre-registration required, unless otherwise noted.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, February 4
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection

Sunday, February 4
2–3 p.m.

This exhibition of drawings by Henri Matisse showcases the mastery of draftsmanship by two of the most significant artists of the twentieth century: Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015). Curated by Kelly in 2014, the exhibition speaks to his admiration for Matisse, as well as to the centrality of drawing in both artists’ practices. Accompanying the forty-five rarely exhibited works by Matisse, Kelly selected nine of his own lithographic drawings that derive from his time in France when the American artist studied Matisse’s sketches and studies of nature and human figures. Join UMMA docents as they explore this artistic dialogue, seeing one artist through the eyes of another.

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection is organized by the American Federation of Arts and the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum in collaboration with The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.

This exhibition was made possible by the generous support of the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust and The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation. Additional support provided by the JFM Foundation and Mrs. Donald M. Cox.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and the Department of the History of Art.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, February 11
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters and New at UMMA: Paul Rand

Sunday, February 11
2–3 p.m.

In the 1980s, Japan’s strong trade surplus and currency were causing friction and antagonism overseas. In response, three renowned Japanese artists took on the challenge of changing Japan’s global image through graphic design. Their eye-catching designs often incorporated familiar traditional symbols and motifs, notably the iconic red circle against a white background of Japan’s national flag, from which this exhibition gains it name, Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters. Paul Rand also crafted memorable graphic design in the second half of the twentieth century. Rand was celebrated for crafting the brand identities of such American corporate icons as ABC, IBM, UPS, and Westinghouse. This installation features the poster Rand created as part of IBM’s THINK promotional campaign, a rebus which transforms the letters of IBM’s logo into pictures. Join Docents as they introduce and connect these two exciting exhibitions focusing on graphic design.

Paul Rand’s work was recently gifted to UMMA by Maria Phillips and Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo as a part of a larger gift of works by this artist.

Lead support for the Red Circle exhibition is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, February 18
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection
Sunday, February 18
2–3 p.m.

This exhibition of drawings by Henri Matisse showcases the mastery of draftsmanship by two of the most significant artists of the twentieth century: Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015). Curated by Kelly in 2014, the exhibition speaks to his admiration for Matisse, as well as to the centrality of drawing in both artists’ practices. Accompanying the forty-five rarely exhibited works by Matisse, Kelly selected nine of his own lithographic drawings that derive from his time in France when the American artist studied Matisse’s sketches and studies of nature and human figures. Join UMMA docents as they explore this artistic dialogue, seeing one artist through the eyes of another.

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection is organized by the American Federation of Arts and the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum in collaboration with The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.

This exhibition was made possible by the generous support of the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust and The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation. Additional support provided by the JFM Foundation and Mrs. Donald M. Cox.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and the Department of the History of Art.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, February 25
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation

Sunday, February 25
2–3 p.m.

Aftermath examines landscape photographs made at the sites of natural or human-made disasters including volcano eruptions and floods, massacres and uprisings, and even nuclear explosions. The photographs picture well-known or, at times, untold stories of violence, tragedy, and loss. Each scene is visually stunning yet viewers may be surprised at the elements of beauty and tranquility present in these tragic landscapes. The images remind us that disaster is often a collective experience that can tear apart the seams of a culture’s social fabric and shape histories of a culture well after an event. UMMA docents will guide visitors as they contemplate photography’s role in depicting and shaping representations of past and present landscapes of devastation.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

 

 

UMMA Programs

Zell Visiting Writers Series: Robin Coste Lewis and Elif Batuman
Thursday, February 1
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Robin Coste Lewis, the winner of the National Book Award for Voyage of the Sable Venus, is the poet laureate of Los Angeles. She is the writer-in-residence at the University of Southern California, a Cave Canem fellow, and a fellow of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities. She received her BA from Hampshire College, her MFA in poetry from New York University, an MTS in Sanskrit and comparative religious literature from the Divinity School at Harvard University, and a PhD in poetry and visual studies from the University of Southern California. Lewis was born in Compton, California; her family is from New Orleans.

Elif Batuman has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2010. She is the author of the novel, The Idiot, and The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her stories have been anthologized in the 2014 Best American Travel Writing and the 2010 Best American Essays collections. She is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and a Paris Review Terry Southern Prize for Humor. Batuman holds a doctoral degree in comparative literature from Stanford University. From 2010 to 2013, she was writer-in-residence at Koç University, in Istanbul. She lives in New York.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage.

SMTD@UMMA: Inexact Observations
Thursday, February 1
7–8 p.m.
Museum Apse

Free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Curator and artist Ellsworth Kelly’s Suite of Plant Lithographs are, according to the artist, “exact observations” in which “nothing is changed or added,” allowing the truth of each flower or leaf to make itself felt. But can an artist ever create a rendition that doesn’t also include their unique perceptions? SMTD Piano Professor Logan Skelton and colleagues will present folk music arrangements by Bela Bartok and others to investigate this question through a musical lens.

The SMTD@UMMA performance series is generously supported by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund and the Greg Hodes and Heidi Hertel Hodes—Partners in the Arts Endowment Fund.

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection is organized by the American Federation of Arts and the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum in collaboration with The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.

This exhibition was made possible by the generous support of the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust and The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation. Additional support provided by the JFM Foundation and Mrs. Donald M. Cox.

Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, and the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and the Department of the History of Art.

Mark Webster Reading Series
Friday, February 2
7–8 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends – a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

This week’s reading features Graham Cotten and Clayton Wickham.

Graham Cotten is from Birmingham, Alabama. Before entering the MFA Program here, he clerked for Chief Judge Blackburn in the Northern District of Alabama, and worked as a litigator. His short stories have appeared in American Short Fiction and on NPR.org.

Clayton Wickham is a fiction writer from Richmond, VA. He currently lives in Ann Arbor.

UMMA Dialogue: Mediating Disaster 
Sunday, February 4
3–4:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

The exhibition Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation focuses on landscape photographs made at the sites of natural or human-made disasters spanning from ancient Pompeii to September 11, 2001. Join Jennifer Friess, Assistant Curator of Photography, for an introduction to the exhibition, which explores the active role photographs play in shaping our experiences and memories of a disastrous event, followed by a presentation on  representations of catastrophe in film by Daniel Herbert, Associate Professor of Screen Arts & Culture. A discussion between Friess and Herbert and Q & A with the audience will follow.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Monday, February 5
12–1 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Tuesday, February 6
4–5 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

ArtsX UMMA presents: UNDEFINED
Friday, February 9
7–9 p.m.
Forum, Museum Apse

 

In today’s fractured environment where our identities are too often framed in ways that divide us, ArtsX UMMA: UNDEFINED is an evening of student performance that aims to reject divisive categorization, emphasize the fluidity of the human experience, and view our differences and similarities as cause for celebration.

Performances include dance, music, spoken word, and a variety of mixed media and digital arts. Artists include Anthony Coffee, Spencer Haney, Olivia Johnson, Alex Kime, Hannah Marcus, Maddy Joss & Johnny Matthews, Augie Lessins & Daniel Kumapayi, Red Shoe Company, Nichole Reehorst, and more!

Join us for this special evening hosted by the UMMA Student Engagement Council,  in partnership with Arts at Michigan, the Michigan Community Scholars Program, the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, and Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs.

“I’m a lychee peel in peril
Plates tipping off the table
By catnipped paw.
I’m those ecstatic missing thumbs.
I’m ghosting the trains until home.
I’m a wash-and- wear sunburnt mess of curls.
I’m 7 Train Love Local,
No names Express.”
— From “Song of Waxing Gibbous” in Solecism by Rosebud Ben-Oni (Virtual Artists
Collective, 2013)

Student programming at UMMA is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

ArtsX UMMA: UNDEFINED is presented by the UMMA Student Engagement Council and co-sponsored by Arts at Michigan, the U-M Department of Dance, the Michigan Community Scholars Program, the Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs, and the School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Additional partners include the U-M Spectrum Center.

Family Art Studio: Red Circle
Saturday, February 10
11 a.m.–1 p.m. and 2–4 p.m.

Free. Registration is required: email umma-program-registration@umich.edu. Please include date and title of program in the subject line of your email. The 2 p.m. session is currently full, please email to register for the 11 a.m. session.

Create your own project inspired by the bold Japanese graphic design in UMMA’s exhibition Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters. Enjoy a gallery tour with UMMA docents followed by a hands-on workshop led by local artist Sophie Grillet. Designed for families with children ages six and up to experience art together. Parents must accompany children.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

Lead support for Red Circle is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Storytime at the Museum
Saturday, February 10
11:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
UMMA Store

Storytime at the Museum promotes art enjoyment for our youngest patrons. Children ages three to six are invited to join in on some children’s fun, hear a story, and do a short activity responding to the art on display. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.

Storytime is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

“My Turn” Special ASD Access Hours
Sunday, February 11
10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Registration is required and opens one month before the event date. Visit myturn.eventbrite.com to register. For more information, call 734-647-0522.

UMMA is pleased to participate, for the second year, in a program created for families affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). “My Turn” was developed by the Ann Arbor Hands On Museum to implement accessible and inclusive programming, particularly for families affected by ASD. On Sunday, February 11, UMMA will open exclusively to “My Turn” for a sensory friendly program allowing families to enjoy art in a fun and welcoming atmosphere. Families will have access to special hands-on activities in the galleries that will help encourage exploration and discovery.

The Museum will offer sensory reducing accessories and a quiet area with tactile toys for families who need to step away from the activities for a bit. This event is recommended for ages 5-18, however all are welcome to participate.

“My Turn” programs are coordinated by the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum and take place on second Sundays throughout the year. For more information, please go to www.myturncommunity.org.

Zell Visiting Writers Series: Hieu Minh Nguyen and Nicholson Baker
Thursday, February 15
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Hieu Minh Nguyen is the author of This Way to the Sugar (Write Bloody Press, 2014) which was a finalist for both a Minnesota Book Award and a Lambda Literary Award. A queer Vietnamese American poet, Hieu is a Kundiman fellow and a poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine. His work has also appeared in the Southern Indiana Review, Guernica, Ninth Letter, Devil’s Lake, Bat City Review, the Paris-American, and elsewhere. Hieu is a nationally touring poet, performer, and teaching artist. He lives in Minneapolis.

Nicholson Baker is the author of nine novels, including Mezzanine and Vox, and four works of nonfiction, including Double Fold, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award, and House of Holes, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. His work has appeared in The New YorkerHarper’s, and The New York Review of Books. He lives in Maine with his family.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage.

Fridays After 5
Friday, February 16
5–8 p.m.

Stop in to UMMA on select Friday evenings to enjoy special exhibitions and engaging activities at Fridays After 5! With all of UMMA’s galleries remaining open until 8:00 p.m., this exciting series provides an interactive atmosphere for all audiences.

Park in the Maynard Structure (between Liberty and William) and receive free, validated parking. The Museum is always free.

UMMA Fridays After 5 are generously supported by Comerica Bank and State Street District. The media sponsor for Fridays After 5 is Michigan Radio.

Institute for the Humanities and the Penny Stamps Speaker Series Present: Chico MacMurtrie: Border Crossers
Friday, February 16
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.
Chico Macmurtrie is an award winning artist, renowned internationally for his large-scale robotic sculpture, whose work combines materiality and robotics, the visceral and conceptual.  His artist residency and interdisciplinary project “Border Crossers,” led by the Institute for the Humanities, envisions futures free of obstacles and schisms.  Faculty, staff, and students across campus from Engineering, Art and Design, Architecture, Information and the Humanities will work with the artist planning, building, and launching a 40 foot robotic sculpture, an idealistic and iconic image reaching into futures. The project symbolizes the humanities in action, the unique combination of our differences, our collective humanity, forging brave new futures.

Chico MacMurtrie is the Artistic Director of Amorphic Robot Works, an interdisciplinary creative collective located in Brooklyn, NY. MacMurtrie/ARW have received numerous awards for their experimental new media artworks, including five grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Andy Warhol Foundation Grant, the Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship, VIDA Life 11.0, and Prix Ars Electronica. Chico MacMurtrie was awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts in 2016.

Chico MacMurtrie/ARW are currently focusing on the development of the Border Crossers, a series of light weight robotic sculptures that will attempt to cross the US- Mexico border and other borders around the world. The inflatable sculptures rise up to several stories high and extend across a given threshold. Their choreographed performance, originating on both sides of the border, would stage a symbolic connection.

Join us for a reception at the exhibition opening directly following the lecture, at the U-M Institute for the Humanities at 202 S. Thayer in Ann Arbor.

This program is co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Visiting artist Chico MacMurtrie’s residency and project is sponsored by the U-M Institute for the Humanities in partnership with Michigan Robotics and U-M Engineering, U-M School of Information, Penny Stamps Speaker Series, Stamps School of Art and Design, and the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Mark Webster Reading Series
Friday, February 16
7–8 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends – a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

This week’s reading features Laura Preston and Leah Xue.

Laura Preston is a writer and painter from New Jersey. She is the recipient of the Hopwood Award for Nonfiction, the John Wagner Prize, and the Chamberlain Award for Creative Writing. In addition to pursuing her MFA at the University of Michigan, she is the Associate Editor of A Public Space.

Leah lives in Ypsilanti with her dog, Poopy. Poopy is a Taurus/Aries sun sign, and Leah would love to manifest her inner utopia in the outer world, but believes contradictions may have already presented themselves.

 

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