UMMA: March Exhibitions and Events schedule released 

 

Opening Exhibition

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection
March 10–July 22, 2018
A. Alfred Taubman Gallery

This exhibition celebrates Gertrude Kasle (1917–2016), a key figure in the formation of Detroit’s contemporary art community in the 1960s and 70s. A pioneering female gallerist, Kasle provided midwest audiences with a venue in which to experience avant-garde art from centers like New York City, while also supporting and exhibiting regional artists. Featuring a collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement through the early twenty-first century, Exercising the Eyespeaks to the relationships Kasle fostered with local, national, and international artists and her appreciation for artistic expression and experimentation. Critical voices from the last fifty years include Philip Guston, Jane Hammond, Grace Hartigan, Jasper Johns, Michele Oka Doner, and Robert Rauschenberg. The exhibition offers  visitors a unique opportunity to explore a dynamic moment in Detroit’s cultural history and insight into Kasle’s love of looking and learning.

Lead support for Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

 

Continuing Exhibitions

New At UMMA: Paul Rand
Through April 15, 2018 

The Connector

Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, pioneering art director and graphic designer Paul Rand (1914–1996) was celebrated for crafting the brand identities of such American corporate icons as ABC, IBM, UPS, and Westinghouse. Rand considered the designer’s task to be the symbolic communication of a company’s character. This recent acquisition presentation features the poster Rand created as part of IBM’s THINK promotional campaign. The design is a rebus, or visual puzzle, wherein Rand cleverly transforms the letters of IBM’s logo into pictures. The whimsical use of symbols encourages viewers to interpret—or think—in order to comprehend the company’s intended message that it values “insight,” “industriousness,” and “motivation.” The poster is part of a larger recent gift of archival Paul Rand objects donated to UMMA by Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo—professor in the U-M Stamps School of Art and Design and published scholar on Paul Rand—and Maria Phillips.

Patricia Piccinini: The Comforter
Through April 15, 2018

Irving Stenn, Jr. Family Gallery

Australian artist Patricia Piccinini’s strange, hyperreal yet sentimental sculptures are often rooted in her speculative visualizations of future species—beings transformed by, or even created by, developments in genetic engineering and technology.  On view at UMMA, The Comforter presents the likeness of a young girl whose appearance suggests a rare genetic condition causing excessive hair across her face and body. In her lap she tenderly cradles an udder-shaped, eyeless creature—a possible reference to current experiments in genetically altered milk-producing animals. The encounter staged by the sculpture, though curious and unexplained, appears to be one of innocence and intimacy, and suggests the potential for emotional connection between a diversity of beings. This theme is a common one for Piccinini, whose work incorporates (often obliquely) ideas and questions about the ethical implications of scientific progress and the conflicts in our culture between the natural and the man-made.

Lead support for Patricia Piccinini: The Comforter is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, and the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender.

Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters
Through May 6, 2018

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

In the 1980s, Japan’s strong trade surplus and currency were causing friction and antagonism overseas. In response, three renowned Japanese artists—Ikko Tanaka, Shigeo Fukuda, and Kazumasa Nagai—took on the challenge of changing Japan’s global image through graphic design. In posters promoting trade fairs, cultural festivals, exhibitions, and sporting events, they used a powerful language of simple forms, vivid color, and a touch of humor to foster—both nationally and internationally—a deeper understanding of the different faces of Japan and its long cultural history. Their eye-catching designs often incorporated familiar traditional symbols and motifs, notably the iconic red circle against a white background of Japan’s national flag. Archetypal animals, human figures, and landscapes borrowed from folklore and visual culture were also distilled into forms of iconographic clarity. These dazzling posters are a fascinating chapter in the history of Japan’s ongoing efforts to shape its identity in the post-World War II era.

Lead support for Red Circle is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Tim Noble and Sue Webster: The Masterpiece
Through May 13, 2018
Media Gallery

Since the 1980s, British artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster have been known for their shadow sculptures built from materials as diverse as scrap metal, garbage, taxidermy, and sex toys. When light is directed at these assemblages, they project shadows that are exceptionally accurate and intricate representations of other things entirely.

The Masterpiece (2014) is a shadow self-portrait of the artists created from metal casts of dead vermin they collected and welded together into a ball. From afar the casts appear to be a stunning abstract silver sculpture; on closer inspection the disturbing menagerie of creatures emerges, only to change form again—as a shadow on the wall—into a precise and elegant image that is astonishingly different from the objects that create it.

Lead support for Tim Noble and Sue Webster: The Masterpiece is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, the Susan and Richard Gutow Fund, the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities and School for Environment and Sustainability. Additional generous support is provided by the Richard and Janet Miller Fund.

Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation
Through May 27, 2018
Photography Gallery

Over the last 150 years, the medium of photography has powerfully depicted and shaped representations of past and present scenes of devastation. Aftermath examines landscape photographs made at the sites of natural or human-made disasters, capturing the results of destructive forces wrought on the land and its inhabitants, including volcano eruptions and floods, massacres and uprisings, and even nuclear explosions. The photographs portray both well-known and untold stories of violence, tragedy, and loss. Each scene is visually striking, yet viewers may be surprised at the elements of beauty and tranquility present in these tragic landscapes. The exhibition includes images of the aftermath of events spanning over 2,000 years of human history—from ancient Pompeii to September 11, 2001. These photographs remind us that disaster is often a collective experience that can tear apart the seams of a culture’s social fabric and impact societies well after an event.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

Cosmogonic Tattoos
Through June 3, 2018
UMMA Commons and Exterior

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished U­–M art professor Jim Cogswell was invited to create a series of public window installations in response to the holdings of the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist adheres a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative, based on reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. The juxtaposed images address our shared histories and experiences while connecting the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community.

Cosmogonic Tattoos is on view at UMMA through June 3, 2018, and at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology through May 2, 2018.

Lead support for Cosmogonic Tattoos is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

 

Exhibition and Gallery Tours

All of UMMA’s tours and events are free and open to the public. No reservations or pre-registration required, unless otherwise noted.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, March 4
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Cosmogonic Tattoos

Sunday, March 4
2–3 p.m.

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished Stamps School of Art and Design professor Jim Cogswell has been invited to create a series of public window installations at the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist will adhere a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative of reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community. UMMA docents will introduce the juxtaposed images and help connect the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity.

Lead support for Cosmogonic Tattoos is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, March 11
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters and New at UMMA: Paul Rand

Sunday, March 11
2–3 p.m.

In the 1980s, Japan’s strong trade surplus and currency were causing friction and antagonism overseas. In response, three renowned Japanese artists took on the challenge of changing Japan’s global image through graphic design. Their eye-catching designs often incorporated familiar traditional symbols and motifs, notably the iconic red circle against a white background of Japan’s national flag, from which this exhibition gains it name, Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters. Paul Rand also crafted memorable graphic design in the second half of the twentieth century. Rand was celebrated for crafting the brand identities of such American corporate icons as ABC, IBM, UPS, and Westinghouse. This installation features the poster Rand created as part of IBM’s THINK promotional campaign, a rebus which transforms the letters of IBM’s logo into pictures. Join Docents as they introduce and connect these two exciting exhibitions focusing on graphic design.

This work was recently gifted to UMMA by Maria Phillips and Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo.

Lead support for Red Circle is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, March 18
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation
Sunday, March 18
2–3 p.m.

Aftermath examines landscape photographs made at the sites of natural or human-made disasters including volcano eruptions and floods, massacres and uprisings, and even nuclear explosions. The photographs picture well-known or, at times, untold stories of violence, tragedy, and loss. Each scene is visually stunning yet viewers may be surprised at the elements of beauty and tranquility present in these tragic landscapes. The images remind us that disaster is often a collective experience that can tear apart the seams of a culture’s social fabric and shape histories of a culture well after an event. UMMA docents will guide visitors as they contemplate photography’s role in depicting and shaping representations of past and present landscapes of devastation.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

Engaging with Art
Sunday, March 25
1–2 p.m.

UMMA docents will guide visitors through the galleries on tours as diverse as their interests and areas of expertise. Each docent plans a theme and includes a variety of styles and media to illuminate his or her ideas. Themes may be repeated but each docent’s approach and choice of objects is unique.

Engaging with Art tours are generously supported by the Berkowitz Family Endowed Fund.

Guided Tour
Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection

Sunday, March 25
2–3 p.m.

This exhibition celebrates Gertrude Kasle (1917–2016), a key figure in the formation of Detroit’s contemporary art community in the 1960s and 70s. A pioneering female gallerist, Kasle provided midwest audiences with a venue in which to experience avant-garde art from centers like New York City, while also supporting and exhibiting regional artists. Featuring a collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement through the early twenty-first century including Philip Guston, Jane Hammond, Grace Hartigan, Jasper Johns, Michele Oka Doner, and Robert Rauschenberg, among others. Join docents as they explore a dynamic moment in Detroit’s cultural history and insight into Kasle’s love of looking and learning.

Lead support for Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

 

 

UMMA Programs

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Monday, March 5
12–1 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Tuesday, March 6
4–5 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

Ann Arbor Film Festival presents: Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer
Wednesday, March 7
5:30–7:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.
“The function of art is to shake us out of our complacency and comfort,” says Yvonne Rainer, whose avant-garde performances and films have agitated audiences for 50 years. Since co-founding New York’s influential Judson Dance Theater, Rainer’s boundary-crossing art has been labeled in many ways: feminist, conceptual, post-modern, political. Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer (2015, Written and Directed by Jack Walsh, 82 min) examines the contradictions and creativity of this remarkable provocateur—still performing at age 80—and raises the question, what does it mean to be an avant-garde artist today?

Yvonne Rainer exploded onto the performance scene in the early 1960s, a protégé of John Cage and Merce Cunningham, boldly pursuing a minimalist aesthetic, using everyday, often random movements that confounded critics. At Judson, she collaborated with the rule-breaking artists of her generation: Robert Rauschenberg, Trisha Brown, Steve Paxton, Lucinda Childs, and Meredith Monk.  With foundational works like “Trio A,” Rainer radically altered the vocabulary of modern dance forever.

In the 1970s, Rainer turned from performance to filmmaking, bringing both humorous storytelling and dense theory to seven independent features. As she investigated subjects like political power, terrorism, lesbian sexuality, and breast cancer, the labels again poured forth. Were her films “difficult” or “accessible?” Funny or frustrating?  After 25 years of filmmaking and encouraged by dancers including Mikhail Baryshnikov, Rainer, in her 60s, returned to choreography once again to make courageous, unpredictable dances. Feelings Are Facts presents Rainer from her revolutionary roots to her tireless current explorations, breaking rules and challenging audiences no matter what decade she finds herself in.

Following the film, University of Michigan professors will discuss their reflections on the film. Participants include moderator Peter Sparling, Rudolf Arnheim Distinguished Professor of Dance and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Dance; with panelists Diane Kirkpatrick, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Art History Emerita; Jessica Fogel, Professor of Dance; and Holly Hughes, Professor of Art and Design and Theatre & Drama.

This special presentation is brought to you by The Ann Arbor Film Festival, University of Michigan Museum of Art, and University of Michigan Dance Department.

UMMA Dialogue: Think Japan, Act Global: Japanese Graphic Design in the Postwar Period with Curator Natsu Oyobe and Stamps Professor Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo
Friday, March 9
5:30–7:00 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

In the 1980s, Japan’s strong trade surplus and currency were causing friction and antagonism overseas. In response, three renowned Japanese artists—Ikko Tanaka, Shigeo Fukuda, and Kazumasa Nagai—took on the challenge of changing Japan’s global image through graphic design. These designers, and others like them, were passionate about fostering creative relationships with the international design community to enrich their theoretical and artistic practice and create an exchange with lasting impacts across geographic boundaries. On the occasion of the UMMA exhibition Red Circle: Designing Japan in Contemporary Posters, and to commemorate the gift of nearly 100 posters by the three artists from the DNP Foundation for Cultural Promotion, UMMA’s Curator of Asian Art, Natsu Oyobe, will talk with Franc Nunoo-Quarcoo, graphic designer and professor at the Stamps School of Art and Design, about the significance of these artists and their global exchange in the field of graphic design, as well as, take a closer look at the powerful language of simple forms, vivid color, and humor that they employed to foster a deeper understanding of the different faces of Japan and its long cultural history.

Lead support for Red Circle is provided by AISIN, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies.

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Monday, March 12
12–1 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

Office Hours with Director Christina Olsen
Tuesday, March 13
4–5 p.m.
Commons

Here’s your chance to chat with our new director! Come by and say hello, tell her what you love about UMMA, or what you’d like to see change.

Olsen, now a little more than two months into her term, is hosting open office hours in the UMMA Commons in  February, March, and April. She is inviting visitors, U-M staff and faculty, students, and community members to drop in and talk one-on-one about the Museum, ways it might change, and to ask questions.

“I want to hear from the people that care about this Museum, and who want to shape its future,” Olsen says. “UMMA needs to be open to new ideas. A great way to get new ideas is by talking with people face to face.”

Olsen will talk with visitors on a first-come, first-serve basis. Visitors should queue near the director’s table in the UMMA Commons.

Maize Collective Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 14
5:30–7 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

Join Maize Collective for a three-part speaker series to explore topics relating to the music industry. These panel-style discussions will serve as an opportunity to engage with  professionals in the creative industry and learn from their experiences.  Each event will include a moderated discussion followed by Q&A from the audience.

This week’s discussion will focus on studio musicians, and give the audience the opportunity to explore career paths for studio musicians and to learn from guest speakers about their experiences in the field.

The Maize Collective is a U-M student-run community of music lovers, artists, producers and creatives that serves to help students achieve their creative goals. Operating through a series of social and educational events, Maize Collective engages a support network of students eager to provide feedback, contribute to a project, or collaborate on something new.

This program is co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

SMTD@UMMA Performance: Exercising the Ear: Music and Conversation with Augusta Read Thomas
Wednesday, March 14
7–8 p.m.
Museum Apse

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.
Augusta Read Thomas, one of today’s most acclaimed composers, joins U-M composer Roshanne Etezady for conversation about music, art, and the creative process.

“Thomas’ music… fairly explodes with an extroverted boldness of utterance audiences and musicians alike find challenging yet immediate.” (Chicago Tribune)

SMTD students perform some of Thomas’ most intimate chamber works. This program is offered in conjunction with the UMMA exhibition Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection, which celebrates the pioneering gallerist, Gertrude Kasle (1917–2016), who was a key figure in the formation of Detroit’s contemporary art community in the 1960s and 70s. Kasle awakened local communities to the kind of avant-garde art she experienced in New York City and advocated for regional artists that she felt likewise broke with tradition.The SMTD@UMMA performance series is generously supported by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund and the Greg Hodes and Heidi Hertel Hodes—Partners in the Arts Endowment Fund.

Lead support for Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

UMMA After Hours
Friday, March 16
7–10 p.m.
Whole Museum

Drop in during this free community event to enjoy this season’s special exhibitions, hear from UMMA curators in the galleries, and groove to live jazz-funk fusion with the Ypsilanti-based band, Impulse, in a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

Browse the galleries and enjoy new special exhibitions including: a collection of works from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement through the early twenty-first century in Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection; eye-catching contemporary poster designs by renowned Japanese artists, Ikko Tanaka, Shigeo Fukuda, and Kazumasa Nagai; Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation featuring photographs that portray both well-known and untold stories of violence, tragedy, and loss, spanning over 2,000 years of human history—from ancient Pompeii to September 11, 2001; and two sculpture installations, Tim Noble and Sue Webster: The Masterpiece​, a shadow self-portrait of the artists created from metal casts of dead vermin​; and Patricia Piccinini: The Comforter, in which strange and evocative sculptures incorporate ideas and questions about the ethical implications of scientific progress.

Enjoy live music performed by Impulse, an Ypsilanti-based jazz-funk fusion band known for delighting audiences with their unique blend of get-on-up-on-the-floor and laid back sounds.

​Curators’ conversations and light refreshments round out the event.

UMMA After Hours is generously sponsored by Fidelity Investments. The media sponsor for UMMA After Hours is the Ann Arbor Observer.

Mark Webster Reading Series
Friday, March 16
7–8 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends – a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

This week’s reading features Nell David and Franny Choi.

Nell David is a writer from Washington D.C.

Franny Choi is the author of the collection FloatingBrilliantGone (Write Bloody, 2014) and a chapbook, Death by Sex Machine (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017). She is a Kundiman Fellow, an editor at Hyphen Magazine, co-host of the poetry podcast Vs., and a member of the Dark Noise Collective.

Storytime at the Museum
Saturday, March 17
11:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
UMMA Store

Storytime at the Museum promotes art enjoyment for our youngest patrons. Children ages three to six are invited to join in on some children’s fun, hear a story, and do a short activity responding to the art on display. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.

Storytime is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

Zell Visiting Writers Series: Lydia Davis, Reading & Book Signing
Tuesday, March 20
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Museum Apse
This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Lydia Davis, who was awarded the Man Booker International Prize in 2013, is an American writer noted for literary works of extreme brevity, commonly called “flash fiction.” Davis is also a short story writer, novelist, essayist, and translator from French and other languages, and has produced several new translations of French literary classics, including Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust and Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert. Her books include a novel, The End of the Story (1995), several full-length story collections—Can’t and Won’t (2014), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), Samuel Johnson Is Indignant (2002), Almost No Memory (1997), and Break It Down (1986)—and several small-press and limited-edition volumes.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage.

Maize Collective Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 21
5:30–7 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Join Maize Collective for a three-part speaker series to explore topics relating to the music industry. These panel-style discussions will serve as an opportunity to engage with professionals in the creative industry and learn from their experiences.  Each event will include a moderated discussion followed by Q&A from the audience.

This week’s discussion will focus on booking and promoting artists. Panelists include El Club’s Virginia Benson.

The Maize Collective is a student-run community of music lovers, artists, producers and creatives that serves to help students find the resources they need to achieve their creative goals. Operating through a series of social and educational events, Maize Collective engages a support network of students eager to provide feedback, contribute to a project or collaborate on something new.

This program is co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Zell Visiting Writers Series: Lydia Davis, Conversation Event & Book Signing
Thursday, March 22
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Lydia Davis, who was awarded the Man Booker International Prize in 2013, is an American writer noted for literary works of extreme brevity, commonly called “flash fiction.” Davis is also a short story writer, novelist, essayist, and translator from French and other languages, and has produced several new translations of French literary classics, including Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust and Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert. Her books include a novel, The End of the Story (1995), several full-length story collections—Can’t and Won’t (2014), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), Samuel Johnson Is Indignant (2002), Almost No Memory (1997), and Break It Down (1986)—and several small-press and limited-edition volumes.

UMMA is pleased to be the site for the Zell Visiting Writers Series, which brings outstanding writers each semester. The Series is made possible through a generous gift from U-M alumna Helen Zell (AB ’64, LLDHon ’13). For more information, please visit the Zell Visiting Writers Series webpage.

Mark Webster Reading Series
Friday, March 23
7–8 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

One MFA student of fiction and one of poetry, each introduced by a peer, will read their work. The Mark Webster Reading Series presents emerging writers in a warm and relaxed setting. We encourage you to bring your friends – a Webster reading makes for an enjoyable and enlightening Friday evening.

This week’s reading features Callie Collins and Clare Hogan.

Callie Collins is a writer and editor from Austin, Texas. Her work has won a Hopwood Award and been published in the Toast, the Rumpus, and the Collagist, among other venues. She is the codirector of A Strange Object and the cohost of the Webster Reading Series.

Clare Hogan’s poetry has received such awards as a Meader Family Award and an Academy of American Poets Prize. She cohosts the Webster Reading Series. From Washington, DC, she currently lives in Ann Arbor.

In Conversation: Media, Memory, and Disaster in Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation  
Sunday, March 25
3–4 p.m.
Photography Gallery

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please register to secure your place by emailing umma-program-registration@umich.edu. Please include date and title of program in the subject line of your email.

Aftermath considers photography’s role in documenting and commemorating tragic events, including conflicts, natural disasters, and the devastation wrought by modern technology. Disasters often affect particular geographic locations at particular moments. However, photographs have the ability to produce imagined communities of spectators across space and time and play a key role in shaping collective memories of such catastrophic events. Join Sean Kramer, Curatorial Intern in the Department of Photography at UMMA, for a discussion of these complex issues in relation to photographs by Felice Beato, Timothy O’Sullivan, Margaret Bourke-White, and Sally Mann, among others.

Lead support for Aftermath: Landscapes of Devastation is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and Department of Screen Arts and Cultures.

Value the Voice: Triumph
Presented by the U-M Comprehensive Studies Program​ and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies.
Tuesday, March 27
7–8:30 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of educational entertainment known to mankind. From the West African tradition of the Griot to modern day Moth events, storytelling environments have served as a means to pass along history, shape culture, share helpful lessons, and establish a sense of belonging and community.

The U-M Comprehensive Studies Program and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies invite you to explore themes related to campus life, coming of age, and learning and growing, at this series of Moth Style Storyteller Lounge events.  The theme for this final event in the series will be Triumph, stories of overcoming challenges in the college environment. Storytellers include students, faculty and staff, and Voices of Wisdom (alums or community members).​

Light food and refreshments will follow in the UMMA Commons.

For more information, please contact Keith Jason at mrjason@umich.edu or 734-764-9128

Maize Collective Speaker Series
Wednesday, March 28
5:30–7 p.m.
Helmut Stern Auditorium

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.

Join Maize Collective for a three-part speaker series to explore topics relating to the music industry. These panel-style discussions will serve as an opportunity to engage with professionals in the creative industry and learn from their experiences.  Each event will include a moderated discussion followed by Q&A from the audience.

This week’s discussion will focus on the modern landscape for concert and event photography. Panelists include Doug Coombe, Brian Rozman, and Taylor Ohryn.

The Maize Collective is a student-run community of music lovers, artists, producers and creatives that serves to help students find the resources they need to achieve their creative goals. Operating through a series of social and educational events, Maize Collective engages a support network of students eager to provide feedback, contribute to a project or collaborate on something new.

 

 

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