UMMA announces exhibitions & events for June 

Opening Exhibition

See Through: Windows and Mirrors in Twentieth-Century Photography

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

June 2–September 23, 2018

Photography Gallery

See Through: Mirrors and Windows in Twentieth-Century Photography brings together a group of images that are doubly framed—once by the camera lens and again by the border of a mirror or window. By refracting and distorting, revealing and concealing, these reflective and transparent surfaces both draw attention to the photographer’s efforts to frame the world and expose the contingent nature of reality. Highlights from the exhibition include works by Eugène Atget, Robert Doisneau, Elliott Erwitt, Walker Evans, André Kertész, Joanne Leonard, Danny Lyon, and Joel Meyerowitz. By extending the limits of perception, these witty and provocative works invite us to see [through to] new visual possibilities.

Lead support for See Through: Windows and Mirrors in Twentieth-Century Photography is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.

Continuing Exhibitions

Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection

Through July 22, 2018

  1. Alfred Taubman Gallery

This exhibition celebrates Gertrude Kasle (1917–2016), a key figure in the formation of Detroit’s contemporary art community in the 1960s and 70s. A pioneering female gallerist, Kasle provided midwest audiences with a venue in which to experience avant-garde art from centers like New York City, while also supporting and exhibiting regional artists. Featuring a collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement through the early twenty-first century, Exercising the Eye speaks to the relationships Kasle fostered with local, national, and international artists and her appreciation for artistic expression and experimentation. Critical voices from the last fifty years include Philip Guston, Jane Hammond, Grace Hartigan, Jasper Johns, Michele Oka Doner, and Robert Rauschenberg. The exhibition offers visitors a unique opportunity to explore a dynamic moment in Detroit’s cultural history and insight into Kasle’s love of looking and learning.

Lead support for Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

 

New at UMMA: Illuminated Manuscript

Through August 19, 2018

The Connector

Books of hours—custom-made for private devotion in the Christian faith—were a bestseller in medieval Europe. These manuscripts incorporated prayers, hymns, biblical stories, and monthly calendars featuring religious feast days, which were often supplemented by images painted in exquisite detail. Today, books of hours are a testament to the visually rich material culture of the Middle Ages. UMMA was recently gifted a bejeweled double-sided calendar leaf for January. Executed on parchment, the page highlights the material opulence and artistry involved in manuscript illumination. Accompanying the calendar are painted images or miniatures of the labor and characteristic activity of the month, and Aquarius, the zodiac sign for January, embodied by a man collecting water from a stream. The folio’s luminous, gilded surface, accentuated by the use of bright colors, was meant to transport the medieval viewer into a state of spiritual transcendence.

This work was recently gifted to UMMA by Mrs. Carrol Robertsen.

Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa

Through September 9, 2018

The Jan and David Brandon Family Bridge

Historical collecting practices have had a lasting impact on representations of Africa, its history, culture, and life today. Labeled as ‘unknown’ or ‘anonymous,’ African artists became associated with broad cultural styles and collective identities rather than personal creativity and individual agency. The exhibition Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa includes artworks from both named and unrecorded, contemporary and historic artists to tell an alternative story. It explores how the changing attributes of an ‘African’ artist’s identity, and constructions of African identity more broadly, have shaped perceptions of Africa outside of the continent.

Lead support for Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and the African Studies Center. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Department of Afroamerican and African Studies and Susan Ullrich.

 

Marcel Dzama: A Jester’s Dance

Through September 23, 2018

Media Gallery

Canadian artist Marcel Dzama is known for imaginative drawings, sculptures, dioramas, and films rooted in the traditions of Surrealism, Dada and outsider art. His 2013 film Une danse des bouffons (or A jester’s dance) tells the tale of a romance between two principal figures of these traditions: Dada icon Marcel Duchamp and Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins, who was the model for Duchamp’s final, enigmatic artwork Étant donnés. Rife with art-historical references not only to the work of Duchamp but also to Francisco Goya, Francis Picabia and Joseph Beuys, among others, Une danse des bouffons navigates a sexually charged and mesmerizing world in which fantasy and torture run amok. The gallery presentation also includes a storyboard for the film featuring Dzama’s ink and watercolor drawings, renderings of small hybrid figures resembling children’s book illustrations. The drawings underscore the fantastical elements in a film that combines the carnivalesque with a nightmarish exploration of the surreal.

Lead support for Marcel Dzama: A Jester’s Dance is provided by Candy and Michael Barasch. Additional generous support is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment and the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design.

 

Cosmogonic Tattoos

Through June 2, 2019

UMMA Exterior

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished U­–M art professor Jim Cogswell was invited to create a series of public window installations in response to the holdings of the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist adheres a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative, based on reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. The juxtaposed images address our shared histories and experiences while connecting the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community.

Cosmogonic Tattoos is on view at UMMA through June 2, 2019.

Lead support for Cosmogonic Tattoos is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

 

Exhibition & Gallery Tours

Guided Tour

Cosmogonic Tattoos

Sunday, June 3

2–3 p.m.

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished Stamps School of Art and Design professor Jim Cogswell has been invited to create a series of public window installations at the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist will adhere a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative of reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community. UMMA docents will introduce the juxtaposed images and help connect the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity.

Lead support for Cosmogonic Tattoos is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

 

Guided Tour

Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection

Sunday, June 10

2–3 p.m.

This exhibition celebrates Gertrude Kasle (1917–2016), a key figure in the formation of Detroit’s contemporary art community in the 1960s and 70s. A pioneering female gallerist, Kasle provided midwest audiences with a venue in which to experience avant-garde art from centers like New York City, while also supporting and exhibiting regional artists. Featuring a collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement through the early twenty-first century including Philip Guston, Jane Hammond, Grace Hartigan, Jasper Johns, Michele Oka Doner, and Robert Rauschenberg, among others. Join docents as they explore a dynamic moment in Detroit’s cultural history and insight into Kasle’s love of looking and learning.

Lead support for Exercising the Eye: The Gertrude Kasle Collection is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the University of Michigan CEW Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund.

 

Guided Tour

Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa

Sunday, June 17

2–3 p.m.

Historical collecting practices have had a lasting impact on representations of Africa, its history, culture, and life today. Labeled as ‘unknown’ or ‘anonymous,’ African artists became associated with broad cultural styles and collective identities rather than personal creativity and individual agency. The exhibition Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa includes artworks from both named and unrecorded, contemporary and historic artists to tell an alternative story. It explores how the changing attributes of an ‘African’ artist’s identity, and constructions of African identity more broadly, have shaped perceptions of Africa outside of the continent.

Lead support for Unrecorded: Reimagining Artist Identities in Africa is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost and the African Studies Center. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Department of Afroamerican and African Studies and Susan Ullrich.

 

Guided Tour

See Through: Mirrors and Windows in Twentieth-Century Photography

Sunday, June 24

2–3 p.m.

See Through looks at how photographers of these images doubly frame the world around us —once through the frame of the camera lens and, again, through the frame of a reflective mirror or transparent window. UMMA Docents will reveal which photographers include their own reflections in their photographs, highlighting their active role in the creation of images. A tour will also indicate which photographers look outward, enacting an exchange of public and, sometimes, voyeuristic glances; and which look inward to domestic spaces, framing intimate views and personal moments among families and lovers. Mirrors and windows, like the medium of photography itself, expand the limits of the human eye to perceive the world and, in turn, invite viewers to see through to new visual possibilities.

Lead support for See Through: Windows and Mirrors in Twentieth-Century Photography is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.

 

UMMA Programs

In Conversation: See Through: Reflections on Photography

Sunday, June 10

3–4 p.m.

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited: Visit http://conta.cc/2D6WQlJ to register.

See Through: Windows and Mirrors in Twentieth-Century Photography explores how photographers employ windows and mirrors across 100 years of photography practice–from street photography to self-portraiture. The works on view invite us to consider the choices photographers make when constructing their images and, in turn, the manner in which we–as active viewers–see photographs. Accompany Jennifer Friess, UMMA’s Assistant Curator of Photography for a conversation in the gallery about how windows and mirrors, like the medium of photography itself, expand the limits of the human eye to perceive the world.

Lead support for See Through: Windows and Mirrors in Twentieth-Century Photography is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.

Family Art Studio: Ann Arbor Japan Week: Place & Plate

Thursday, June 21

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Free. Registration is required: Visit http://conta.cc/2D7KD09 to register.

Do you have a favorite place? Commemorate it on a decorative plate inspired by 20th century Japanese prints and ceramics. UMMA docents will lead a tour of prints by Saitô Kiyoshi that evoke specific places such as the Diag in Ann Arbor on a rainy day and a famous rock garden in Kyoto, as well as look at the aesthetics of Japanese ceramics and decorative arts. The tour will be followed by a hands-on workshop led by local artist Susan Clinthorne. Designed for families with children ages six and up to experience art together. Parents must accompany children.

This program is offered in conjunction with U-M Center for Japanese Studies’ Ann Arbor Japan Week, June 17-23.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

 

Family Art Studio: Ann Arbor Japan Week: Place & Plate

Thursday, June 21

2–4 p.m.

Free. Registration is required: Visit http://conta.cc/2D8TApQ to register.

Do you have a favorite place? Commemorate it on a decorative plate inspired by 20th century Japanese prints and ceramics. UMMA docents will lead a tour of prints by Saitô Kiyoshi that evoke specific places such as the Diag in Ann Arbor on a rainy day and a famous rock garden in Kyoto, as well as look at the aesthetics of Japanese ceramics and decorative arts. The tour will be followed by a hands-on workshop led by local artist Susan Clinthorne. Designed for families with children ages six and up to experience art together. Parents must accompany children.

This program is offered in conjunction with U-M Center for Japanese Studies’ Ann Arbor Japan Week, June 17-23.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

 

Storytime at the Museum: Ann Arbor Japan Week

Saturday, June 23

11:15 a.m.–12 p.m.

Japan Week, sponsored by the U-M Center for Japanese Studies, is a week of Japan-related programming for youth and families. Storytime at the Museum, which promotes art enjoyment for our youngest patrons, will feature a story about Japan this week, and a hands-on activity related to it. Children ages three to six are invited to join Storytime. Parents must accompany children. Siblings are welcome to join the group. Meet in front of the UMMA Store.

This program is offered in conjunction with U-M Center for Japanese Studies’ Ann Arbor Japan Week, June 17-23.

Storytime is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

 

 

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