University of Michigan Museum of Art Exhibitions and Events

 

Continuing Exhibitions

TRISTIN LOWE: UNDER THE INFLUENCE
THROUGH JANUARY 13, 2019
IRVING STENN, JR. FAMILY GALLERY

Tristin Lowe’s  Under the Influence  is a serene and surreal constellation of three interconnected works:  Argonaut II , an oversized reflective door that leads viewers into the installation,  Lunacy , a twelve-and-half-foot-diameter facsimile of the moon, and  Visither I , a blue neon-light sculpture resembling a nomadic visiting spaceship. Lunacy , the central component of the installation, is constructed of 490 square feet of white felt pieced together by hand and stretched around an inflatable sphere. The surface is branded with craters and other markers that meticulously render the moon’s topography. The installation creates a visceral feeling of time having stopped, as if the cosmos has magically been paused—a sensation that is both captivating and strange. The unlikely experience of encountering the moon at this scale deepens this bewilderment. Under the Influence is a hypnotic work with a conceptual openness that rebuffs obvious narrative or meaning. In the artist’s own words, “there’s a bit of the supernatural or otherworldly at work.”

Lead support for  Tristin Lowe: Under the Influence  is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the Susan and Richard Gutow Endowed Fund.

 

PROOF: THE RYOICHI EXCAVATIONS
THROUGH FEBRUARY 3, 2019
SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS GALLERY

The story of Japanese archaeologist Ryoichi and evidence of his worldwide excavations are explored by Patrick Nagatani in this series of photographs. Nagatani presents a narrative of Ryoichi’s archeological work, supported by images of excavation sites, unearthed artifacts, and Ryoichi’s own journal pages. According to the photographs, Ryoichi discovered evidence of an automobile culture buried at sites across several continents: Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon, and a necropolis in China. This provocative and playful series compels viewers to reflect on how photographs and institutions, such as museums, shape our knowledge of the past and present.

Lead support for  Proof: The Ryoichi Excavations  is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Japan Business Society of Detroit Foundation, and Michigan Engineering.

 

PAUL RAND: THE DESIGNER’S TASK
THROUGH FEBRUARY 10, 2019
THE JAN AND DAVID BRANDON FAMILY BRIDGE

Paul Rand was a giant of American design, whose influential career spanned the second half of the twentieth century. His visionary and pithy conceptions of corporate and non-profit brand identities—though often graphically minimal—embody the artist’s complex philosophy, interest in modernist aesthetics, and singular wit. This exhibition features posters, book covers, and packaging designs from Rand’s beginnings as a pro bono designer for arts and culture publications like Direction magazine to his decades of crafting trailblazing corporate design for companies such as IBM.  Paul Rand: The Designer’s Task  affords viewers the opportunity to explore the genre of graphic design within the context of the art museum and examine how Rand’s intellectual process and impact on visual culture developed over time.

Lead support for  Paul Rand: The Designer’s Task  is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.


ART IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET, 1989 TO TODAY
THROUGH APRIL 7, 2019
ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I | THE CONNECTOR

The internet has changed every aspect of contemporary life—from how we interact with each other to how we work and play.  Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today  examines the radical impact of internet culture on visual art since the invention of the web in 1989. This exhibition presents more than forty works across a variety of media—painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects. It features work by some of the most important artists working today, including Judith Barry, Juliana Huxtable, Pierre Huyghe, Josh Kline, Laura Owens, Trevor Paglen, Seth Price, Cindy Sherman, Frances Stark, and Martine Syms.

Organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, the exhibition at UMMA will be accompanied by a wide range of U-M partnerships and public programming.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today  is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. ​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:

Lead Exhibition Sponsors: Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs

Individual and Family Foundation Donors: William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga

University of Michigan Funding Partners: School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

 

COSMOGONIC TATTOOS
THROUGH JUNE 2, 2019
COMMONS

In celebration of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial in 2017, artist and distinguished U­–M art professor Jim Cogswell was invited to create a series of public window installations in response to the holdings of the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. For this visionary project, the artist adhered a procession of vivid images to the glass walls of the museums in a rhythmically evocative narrative, based on reassembled fragments from a diverse range of artworks in both museums’ permanent collections. The juxtaposed images address our shared histories and experiences while connecting the viewer to the origins and meaning of objects and their power to shape knowledge, memory, and identity. By leveraging the buildings’ unique architecture, the artist expands our understanding of a museum as a cultural repository and highlights the significant role of these institutions in the life of the campus community.

Lead support for  Cosmogonic Tattoos  is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost. Additional support for the artist’s project is provided by the University of Michigan Bicentennial Office and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design.

 

ABSTRACTION, COLOR, AND POLITICS IN THE EARLY 1970s
THROUGH FALL, 2019
ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY II

Can abstract art be about politics? In the early 1970s, that question was hotly debated as artists, critics, and the public grappled with the relationship between art, politics, race, and feminism. Many of those debates centered on bringing to light the roles that gender and race played in how “great modern art” was defined and assessed, and on employing art to advance civil rights. Within this discourse, abstraction had an especially fraught role. To many, the decision by women artists and artists of color to make abstract art seemed to represent a retreat from politics and protest: an abnegation of a commitment to civil rights and feminism.  Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s  presents large-scale work by four leading American artists—Helen Frankenthaler, Sam Gilliam, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson—who chose abstraction as a means of expression within the intense political climate of the early 1970s.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund. University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

 

Guided Exhibition and Gallery Tours
PAUL RAND: THE DESIGNER’S TASK
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6
2–3 p.m.

Paul Rand was a giant of American design whose influential career spanned the second half of the twentieth century. His visionary and pithy conceptions of corporate and non-profit brand identities—though often graphically minimal—embody the artist’s complex philosophy, interest in modernist aesthetics, and singular wit. This exhibition features posters, book covers, and packaging designs from the entirety of Rand’s career. Visit Paul Rand: The Designer’s Task with an UMMA docent to explore the genre of graphic design within the context of the art museum and examine how Rand’s intellectual process and impact on visual culture developed over time.

Lead support for  Paul Rand: The Designer’s Task  is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.

 

PROOF: THE RYOICHI EXCAVATIONS
SUNDAY, JANUARY 13
2–3 p.m.

The story of Japanese archaeologist Ryoichi and evidence of his worldwide excavations are explored by Patrick Nagatani in this series of photographs. Nagatani presents a narrative of Ryoichi’s archeological work, supported by images of excavation sites, unearthed artifacts, and Ryoichi’s own journal pages. According to the photographs, Ryoichi discovered evidence of an automobile culture buried at sites across several continents: Stonehenge, the Grand Canyon,

and a necropolis in China. Docents will introduce this provocative and playful series that compels viewers to reflect on how photographs and institutions, such as museums, shape our knowledge of the past and present.

Lead support for  Proof: The Ryoichi Excavations  is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Japan Business Society of Detroit Foundation, and Michigan Engineering.

ABSTRACTION, COLOR, AND POLITICS IN THE EARLY 1970s
SUNDAY, JANUARY 20
2–3 p.m.

Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s explores large-scale works of art by Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Nevelson, Sam Gilliam, and Al Loving, within the context of highly-charged debates of the early 1970s about aesthetics, politics, race, and feminism. This exhibition explores the gendered and racialized terms upon which great art was defined and assessed, and the strategy of artists to question the identity and aesthetics of the artist making the art. UMMA docents will help visitors look through the lens of the four artists’ works to explore the aesthetic choices inherent in abstraction as well as the acts of staining, pouring, draping—or even taking apart the wall itself—within this charged political context.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund. University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

 

SHORT AND SNAPPY TOURS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 25
3–3:30 p.m.

Student Docents explore love and death, politics and humor, history, mythology, materiality, fashion, food, and other ideas in these short & sweet 15-minute peeks at the UMMA collection. Meet at the UMMA Store. Student programming at UMMA is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

 

SHORT AND SNAPPY TOURS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 25
3:30–4 p.m.

Student Docents explore love and death, politics and humor, history, mythology, materiality, fashion, food, and other ideas in these short & sweet 15-minute peeks at the UMMA collection. Meet at the UMMA Store. Student programming at UMMA is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

 

ART IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET, 1989 TO TODAY
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27
2–3 p.m.

The internet has changed every aspect of contemporary life—from how we interact with each other to how we work and play. Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today , examines the radical impact of internet culture on visual art since the invention of the web in 1989. Join UMMA docents as they explore the more than forty works across a variety of media—painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects—in this exciting exhibition.

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today  is organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston and curated by Eva Respini, Barbara Lee Chief Curator, with Jeffrey De Blois, Assistant Curator.

Major support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. ​UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: Candy and Michael Barasch, University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. Individual and Family Foundation Donors: William Susman and Emily Glasser; The Applebaum Family Compass Fund: Pamela Applebaum and Gaal Karp, Lisa Applebaum; P.J. and Julie Solit; Vicky and Ned Hurley; Ann and Mel Schaffer; Mark and Cecelia Vonderheide; and Jay Ptashek and Karen Elizaga

University of Michigan Funding Partners: School of Information; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Institute for Research on Women and Gender; Institute for the Humanities; Department of History of Art; Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning; Department of American Culture; School of Education; Department of Film, Television, and Media; Digital Studies Program; and Department of Communication Studies

UMMA Programs
UMMA BOOK CLUB: ART, IDEAS, & POLITICS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
12–1 p.m.
ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY II

The Art, Ideas & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition  Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s . Surrounded by the large-scale artworks by Sam Gilliam, Helen Frankenthaler, Al Loving, and Louise Nevelson, we will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include  Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power  (Jan 10),  Art on My Mind, Visual Politics  by bell hooks (March 14), Ninth Street Women  by Mary Gabriel (May 9), Flamethrowers  by Rachel Kushner (July 11), and  How We Get Free , edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12).

Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Wandering Song, an anthology of the Central American diaspora.

The Art, Ideas & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore and at book club meetings at a 15% book club discount.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of this exhibition: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund. University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

FAMILY ART STUDIO: DON’T THROW IT OUT! LET’S MAKE ART WITH IT!
SATURDAY, JANUARY 12
11 a.m.–1 p.m.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM

The event is free, but registration is required. Visit our website to register.

Create a 3D sculpture inspired by the artist Louise Nevelson who was known to make work using everyday objects and materials she found on the street. We will explore the UMMA exhibition,Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s , which features a large-scale work by Nevelson, as well as other well known abstract expressionists, followed by a hands-on workshop with local artists Susan Clinthorne and Nora Venturelli.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund. University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

FAMILY ART STUDIO: DON’T THROW IT OUT! LET’S MAKE ART WITH IT!
SATURDAY, JANUARY 12
2–4 p.m.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM

The event is free, but registration is required. Visit our website to register.

Create a 3D sculpture inspired by the artist Louise Nevelson who was known to make work using everyday objects and materials she found on the street. We will explore the UMMA exhibition,Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s , which features a large-scale work by Nevelson, as well as other well known abstract expressionists, followed by a hands-on workshop with local artists Susan Clinthorne and Nora Venturelli.

Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.

UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of Abstraction, Color, and Politics in the Early 1970s: Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund. University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

PENNY W. STAMPS SPEAKER SERIES AND UMMA PRESENT: EVA RESPINI: ART IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET
THURSDAY, JANUARY 17
5:10–6:30 p.m.
HISTORIC THEATER | MICHIGAN THEATER, 603 E. LIBERTY ST., ANN ARBOR, MI

 

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