UMMA: Upcoming exhibitions and events in July

 

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

THROUGH JULY 28, 2019
A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I
The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene  awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. More than thirty-five international artists, including Sammy Baloji, Liu Bolin, Dana Levy, Mary Mattingly, Pedro Neves Marques, Gabriel Orozco, Trevor Paglen, and Thomas Struth, respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.
The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene  is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.
Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability.
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2019
MEDIA GALLERY
Jason DeMarte: Garden of Artificial Delights  presents an enigmatic world filled with unexpected and unsettling sensory temptations. In this immersive installation of photographs and wallpaper, Michigan-based photographer Jason DeMarte weaves together detailed images of fauna (birds, caterpillars, and moths) and flora (local plants and flowers). Each scene is set against ominous cloudy skies, which rain melted ice cream, whipped topping, candies, and glossy paint. Overburdened with decorations, the flowers and plants begin to decay, leaving the birds and insects unable to survive for long in this overly sweet environment. DeMarte’s illusionistic landscapes recall the long tradition of still life painting in Europe and America, and a rich history of fantasy environments represented in literature and film—from Alice’s Wonderland to Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. Yet, his images decidedly foreground the complicated visual circumstances of our contemporary moment and provoke us to consider this imagined and oversaturated world as analogous to our own.
Support for  Jason DeMarte: Garden of Artificial Delights  is provided by P.J. and Julie Solit, Amelia and Eliot Relles, and the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment.
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15, 2019
THE CONNECTOR
Egon Schiele (1890-1918), one of the most well-known and controversial figures of Austrian Expressionism, made more than 3,o00 works over the span of his short life and career. Working at the turn of the twentieth century, Schiele challenged the classical conventions of the day producing emotionally charged—often unsettling—drawings and watercolors depicting landscapes, portraits, and nudes. Two retired U-M professors recently gifted four works of art by Schiele to UMMA. Throughout their lifetimes, Frances McSparran (English language and literature) and the late Ernst Pulgram (Romance and classical linguistics) collected over forty Austrian and German Expressionist works, donating many of them to the Museum. The three watercolors and one drawing on view in this special installation complement the couple’s previous gifts of works by Schiele and his contemporaries Oskar Kokoschka, George Grosz, and Gustav Klimt, reuniting these important works that together provide important insights into this tumultuous period in European history.
THROUGH SEPTEMBER 22, 2019
IRVING STENN, JR. FAMILY GALLERY
Visitors entering Floyer’s installation  Things  (2009) in the Irving Stenn, Jr. Family Gallery encounter a collection of identical plinths that would ordinarily be used to display art objects in the Museum, but these platforms are empty. In place of visible objects, each plinth is equipped with a speaker from which we hear the word “thing” sung—edited out of and isolated from a range of pop songs. The result is an amusing and thoughtful exploration of language, meaning, and the conventions of museum presentation and spectatorship.
The installation, like much of Berlin-based artist Ceal Floyer’s art, is characteristically austere, but its visual simplicity masks a more complicated message—often a wry cerebral twist the artist creates through language-based symbols and aesthetic devices. Floyer’s work is rooted in conceptual art, in which the idea, delivered through words or acts that undercut or supersede formal qualities, is the essence of the artwork.
Lead support for  Ceal Floyer: Things  is provided by the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment and Michigan Engineering. Additional generous support is provided by the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design, Institute for the Humanities, CEW+ Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Fund, and School of Music, Theatre & Dance.
THROUGH OCTOBER 27, 2019
SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS GALLERY
Two fascinating stories converge in one very special exhibition: One tracks the development and subsequent worldwide acclaim of contemporary Inuit art from the Canadian Arctic. The other traces the Power family’s seminal role in supporting Inuit art and introducing it to a U.S. audience. Seventy years ago, neither the Inuit artists nor the Power family could have foreseen the tremendous popularity that this work would come to enjoy. Taking its title from the Inuktitut word for “unexpected,” this stirring exhibition showcases 58 works from the collection of Philip and Kathy Power, most from the very early contemporary period of the 1950s and 60s. Included are exquisite sculptures of ivory, bone, and stone, as well as stonecut and stencil prints, some from the first annual Inuit print collection in 1959. Among the renowned Inuit artists featured in this historic survey are Kanaginak Pootoogook, Kenojuak Ashevak, Lucy Qinnuayuak, Niviaksiak, Osuitok Ipeelee and Johnny Inukpuk.
The exhibition also serves as a promising launch pad for future groundbreaking research, exhibitions, and programming related to Inuit art and culture at the University of Michigan, thanks to the generosity of the Power family.
This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.
THROUGH FEBRUARY 9, 2020
A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY II
In the midst of the political and cultural upheavals of the ’60s and ’70s, artists, critics, and the public grappled with the relationship between art, politics, race, and feminism. During these decades, the notion that abstraction was a purely formal and American art form, concerned only with timeless themes disconnected from the present, was met with increased skepticism. Women artists and artists of color began to actively and assertively explore abstraction’s possibilities. The artworks in  Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s  demonstrate both radical and disarming changes in how artists worked and what they thought their art was about. Their new formal and intellectual strategies—seen here across large-scale and miniature work—dramatically transformed the practice of abstraction in the 1960s and 1970s in a politically shifting American landscape.
UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support:
Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund

University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies

GUIDED EXHIBITION AND GALLERY TOURS

SUNDAY, JULY 7
2–3 p.m.
MEET AT UMMA STORE
The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene  awakens us to the physical and social effects of the Anthropocene, a much-debated term used to define a new geological epoch shaped by human activity. Structured around ecological issues, the exhibition presents photography, video, and sculpture that address subjects and themes related to raw materials, disasters, consumption, loss, and justice. Join an UMMA docent tour to explore how the international artists in this exhibition respond to dire global and local circumstances with resistance and imagination—sustaining an openness, wonder, and curiosity about the world to come.
The World to Come: Art in the Age of the Anthropocene  is organized by the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Kerry Oliver-Smith, Harn Museum of Art Curator of Contemporary Art. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, UF Office of the Provost, National Endowment for the Arts, C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, Ken and Laura Berns, Daniel and Kathleen Hayman, Ken and Linda McGurn, Susan Milbrath, an anonymous foundation, UF Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere, UF Office of Research and Robert and Carolyn Thoburn, with additional support from a group of environmentally-minded supporters, the Robert C. and Nancy Magoon Contemporary Exhibition and Publication Endowment, Harn Program Endowment, and the Harn Annual Fund.
Lead support for the local presentation of this exhibition is provided by Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, Tom Porter in honor of the Michigan Climate Action Network, the Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and School for Environment and Sustainability.
SUNDAY, JULY 14
2–3 p.m.
MEET AT UMMA STORE
The reinstallation of UMMA’s Apse, Collection Ensemble , highlights the breadth and variety of the Museum’s collection and juxtaposes works of art from different artists, periods, areas, and media. The installation is organized around a very large photograph of a Baroque church by Candida Höfer. From this centerpiece, the works of art are grouped in scenes or distinctive vignettes comprised of a broad mix of American, European, African, and Asian art from across media. The reinstallation doesn’t adhere to either chronological or geographic boundaries. Vera Grant, UMMA’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, and curator of this installation, says: “The exhibition recasts the role of the collection as an active, creative, sometimes startling source of material and ideas, open for debate and interpretation. The arrangements remind us that works of art can change in meaning and affect when placed in new contexts.” Join an UMMA docent to explore and interpret this exciting new project.
SUNDAY, JULY 21
2–3 p.m.
MEET AT UMMA STORE

In celebration of UMMA’s new Power Family Program for Inuit Art, the Museum presents a special exhibition of two incredible, intertwining stories. One traces the development of contemporary Inuit art in the Canadian Arctic from the 1950s to the present. The other relates the fascinating story of the Power family’s important role in supporting and promoting Inuit art from the outset, bringing public attention to its artistic strength and cultural importance. The Power family’s collection is unusual in its strong representation of early contemporary carvings, incised drawings on ivory and antler, soapstone sculptures, and prints that evolved as Inuit artists developed their own artistic voices and responded creatively to their changing world.

This exhibition inaugurates the Power Family Program for Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.

UMMA PROGRAMS

THURSDAY, JULY 11
12–1 p.m.
A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY II
The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club is a partnership between UMMA and Literati Bookstore in connection with UMMA’s exhibition  Abstraction, Color, and Politics: The 1960s and 1970s . We will read and discuss bold and critical voices—both fiction and nonfiction—guided by Literati Bookstore’s Creative Programs Manager, Gina Balibrera Amyx. Books will explore visions and critiques relevant to abstract art as well as the immense social changes of the period, and include Flamethrowers   by Rachel Kushner (July 11) and  How We Get Free , edited by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Sept 12).
Gina Balibrera Amyx is the Creative Program Manager at Literati Bookstore, and a graduate of Zell MFA Program. Her writing has been featured in the Boston Review , Ploughshares , Michigan Quarterly Review , and The Wandering Song , an anthology of the Central American diaspora.
The Art, Ideas, & Politics Book Club will meet on the second Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m. in the exhibition gallery. Pick and choose or come to all of them. Books will be available for sale at Literati Bookstore as well as after book club meetings at UMMA, at a 15% book club discount.
UMMA gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support.
Lead Exhibition Sponsors: University of Michigan Office of the Provost, Michigan Medicine, and College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Exhibition Endowment Donors: Richard and Rosann Noel Endowment Fund, Herbert W. and Susan L. Johe Endowment, and Robert and Janet Miller Fund
University of Michigan Funding Partners: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, School of Social Work, Department of Political Science, and Department of Women’s Studies
SATURDAY, JULY 13
11 a.m.–1 p.m.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
This event is free, but registration is required. Registration will open June 7 on UMMA’s website.
Families with children ages six and up are invited to look, learn, and create together during UMMA’s Family Art Studio sessions. Create your own project inspired by the UMMA exhibition The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq ​ (which means “sensing the invisible just beyond it” or unexpected), followed by a hands-on workshop with local artist and UMMA docent Sophie Grillet.
This event is in conjunction with the Power Family Program in Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.
Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.
SATURDAY, JULY 13
2–4 p.m.
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
This event is free, but registration is required. Registration will open June 7 on the UMMA website.
Families with children ages six and up are invited to look, learn, and create together during UMMA’s Family Art Studio sessions. Create your own project inspired by the UMMA exhibition The Power Family Program for Inuit Art: Tillirnanngittuq ​ (which means “sensing the invisible just beyond it” or unexpected), followed by a hands-on workshop with local artist and UMMA docent Sophie Grillet.
Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.
This event is in conjunction with the Power Family Program in Inuit Art, established in 2018 through the generosity of Philip and Kathy Power.
Family Art Studio is generously supported by the University of Michigan Credit Union Arts Adventures Program, UMMA’s Lead Sponsor for Student and Family Engagement.
SUNDAY, JULY 14
3–4 p.m.
A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERY I
This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  
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